Meet the Artist Archive 03/12/2021 to 05/28/2021

Meet the Artist events every Friday at 5-6 pm

Join the Guild in celebrating one of our fine artists in an informal presentation of their work, process, inspiration and tools. Raise a glass! You will be able to ask questions. The program is usually held on Fridays at 5 p.m. on Zoom.

Meet the Artist
Ivor Parry

Friday, March 12, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

 

 

For painting surfaces I use canvas, wood, MDF board, and heavy watercolour paper, with mediums oil (mostly), acrylic, charcoal, pencil, and watercolour. Starting with a line, a swish of paint on a brush, colour, or maybe blocking out random geometric and irregular shapes, that will nudge me in a direction that keeps developing as I paint. My objective whether representational or design oriented is to achieve a strong visual image that I feel works as a complete picture and viewers will appreciate. 

Meet the Artist
Adrian Holmes

Friday, March 19, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

"My passion is painting portraits. I love to work in oil and watercolor.My paintings could be referred to as impressionistic, which does fairly describe my work. I have had the benefit of observing the masters of impressionism. I believe I fall into the simple reportage style of John Singer Sargent (American, 1856 – 1925) who in his many watercolors, reported what he saw with elegance and élan. It’s obvious that Mr. Sargent used watercolor painting as a relief from the riggers of painting society portraits. One quick glance at a Sargent watercolor and you are immediately aware that the artist is having fun and rejuvenating his spirit.

 

It is my simple hope that my work can convey the same energy and spirit. My influence lies in my good fortune to have studied with Lian Quan Zhen the Chinese watercolorist and author. It is the simple expressive classic Chinese brush stroke that forms the backbone of my work. My philosophy is one brush stroke says a hundred words Therefore, a painting of a hundred strokes will say a thousand words. Like Haiku I strive to say more with less. 

My technique is like a Chinese artist using a very narrow palette. However, my palette is made up of traditional English watercolors. Color is a secondary consideration and a reflection of the scene I am painting. It is the interest and detail in the brush stroke and the tonal value in the colors that bring harmony to the work.

 

I am a member of the New Jersey Watercolor Society. I also belong to the Art Students League and The Ridgewood Art Institute. I was born in London and came to the United States in the mid 70's. I freelance as a graphic designer working mainly in advertising. In 1978 I was a founding partner of a small graphic design company.

 

I was educated in fine art at the Ealing School of Art and the Twickenham School of Art. I studied graphic design at the London College of Print and Design and the Plymouth College of Art."

 

Adrian is organizing the Guild of Berkshire Artists Portrait Painting program. You are invited to go to BerkshireArtists.org under "Making Art" for more information on the Portrait Painting program.

Meet the Artist

Mark Mellinger​

Friday, March 26, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

In the '60s I studied at Cooper Union Art School, later I worked in biology research; ultimately, becoming a psychologist. While continuing my psychoanalytic practice, I paint, collage and make constructions of found objects in my Pittsfield studio. I love the Berkshire art scene.

 

Meet the Artist

Susan Smith

Friday, April 2, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

Over 3 decades ago I majored in fine arts at Skidmore College.  I focused on oil painting and not listening to my professors. Sadly I was very rigid about how I wanted to paint and was not necessarily ready to really learn new things.  After a long break, I returned to creating via photography.   I am finally ready to "learn" and I am loving the journey.

 

I am grateful for an incredibly supportive community, in particular Dana Goedewaagen and Bruce Panock.  It is remarkable how much free learning there is through facebook critique groups, challenge groups and camera clubs.  For now I focus on nature and immensely enjoy hiking with my camera and dog.  I have embraced being a beginner and it has lead to wonderful things. 

 

Meet the Artist

Ruth Drysdale

 

Friday, April 9, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

 

I have been drawing all my life but never found much excitement from trying to reproduce that which was around me. In 2008 I met up with a  class of late bloomers. The teacher said I am not going to ask you to come from your imagination. Where were our images to come from? The best way I can describe it is to quote other artists, these are the quotes that have become like rules to me:

“Art Comes from your heart and it’s full of magic.”
~ Yasmin Kobt (aged 10)

“You can find out how to do something and then do it, Or do something and then find out what you did.”
~ Isamu Noguchi

We all can relate to the fear of having a blank page in front of us. Before you know it you root around in your mind for a picture from your mental picture album, the image is old before it hits the paper. I learned the value of a random mark on paper, no mental search for an idea is necessary. Everyone can find that mark. Your hand starts drawing and before you know it you have a completely fresh original image. I believe every individual has the potential within, right now, to bring truth and beauty out into the visible world. I have found the art that I am passionate about.

 

Meet the Artist

Claudia Ricci

 

Friday, April 16, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

I have no formal training in art. The way I came to painting was via my first novel, "Dreaming Maples."  The story features several women who are passionate about their art. Young Candace is devoted to her painting. I spent a lot of time doing research for the book at the Clark Art Museum.  The novel is set in part in North Adams, MA, not far from the Clark. And the climactic scene in the book takes place at the Clark, beneath Renoir's "Blonde Bather."

The way I write fiction, I "SEE" every scene before I can write it. Many people say that when they read my books they feel as though they are watching a movie. So as I wrote, I kept seeing and seeing. Some of what I saw were paintings. Some of what I wrote was about painting. My journals from that period are filled with drawings and small paintings.

Two months after the book was published, in 2002, I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Disease. The chemo was ruthless. I could barely function. I wrote poetry to get me through. But I also started to wander around the house in a chemo-induced fog, cutting out pieces of paper and making colorful  collages.

One week, when I was headed to Sloan Kettering, my dear friend Leslie Gabosh, who at the time had an art store, handed me a fistful of colored pencils and a small art pad. She picked a Black-eyed Susan growing outside the door and she told me I should draw while waiting for my chemo at Sloan.  I did. It helped so much. Art cured and healed my soul just as the chemo and radiation healed my body.

At some point during that summer of chemo, I painted my first large canvas. I remember standing beside our beautiful pond, surrounded by the green lush of summer. My painting: a hillside of fir trees against a beautiful blue sky.  The painting was OK, but I quickly realized that I didn't have much talent as a realistic painter.

So I started throwing paint on the canvas, the way Jackson Pollock used to. (By the way, I have taken a workshop or two, and my paintings have been compared to those by Joan Mitchell. I consider that great praise!)

I continued to paint outdoors beside the pond. Whenever a painting wasn't working, I would simply hose it down and start again. Over and over and over, I tried to let the PAINT AND THE DESIGN HAVE THEIR SAY.  My goal always was to just STAY OUT OF THE WAY!

That was 2002. I have been throwing acrylic paint on canvas for almost 20 years. What have I learned? That painting is alive. More alive than writing. AS VIBRANT AS DIVINE LIGHT! 

You write a story or a novel, and it is made of  paper (or now, it's an ebook.) But one sits on a bookshelf and the other resides in your iPad.  Paintings on the other hand are lively and pulsing. The colors heat up your soul. When you are done, you can hang them, store them in the basement or give them to your kids and friends. I think of people who have my paintings and I smile at each one. PAINTING IS SO MUCH FUN!

At one point, my son Noah, who was living in New York, had so many of my paintings in his apartment that I used to joke that I had a gallery in Brooklyn :) 

So that's the story, or at least, that's all I need to say right now.

 

Meet the Artist

Pennington Pitts

Friday, April 23, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

 

Using various found and invented materials I seek an artistic expression that is straightforward, spirited, tactilely inviting, and lovely to look at- be it as a wall piece or as artifact. Persistent themes in my art work include evolutionary highlights, nature (giraffes, corvids), and rocks. Lately, I have been featuring spring flowers. 70 years of crafting has included puppetry, decorated gourds, and textured wire sculptures. Favorite materials  I have worked with extensively include grocery bags, theatre lighting gels, silicon caulking, and (my latest) fabric-foam “tiles” for mosaics. 

 

Meet the Artist

Peggy Reeves

Friday, April 30, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

 

The chemigrams of Peggy Reeves, hybrids of chemistry-based photography and
painting, inherently involve a process of gradual deterioration that leaves behind visual remnants of this creative history. Subsequent digital editing finalizes these landscapes, creating what Reeves considers “a metaphor for natural and man-made forces on the environment.” This latest body of work concerns itself with the physical and geographic challenges faced by refugees attempting to cross the United States’ southern border. In lieu of human figures, Reeves places her emphasis on the obstacles and barriers presented by the land and nature which inhibits these migrants’ safe crossing.

 

Meet the Artist

Natasha Wein

Friday, May 7, 2021 at 5-6 pm


Zoom link:
Join on Zoom

Meeting ID: 812 5319 8713

Password: 998958

Not all stories start with words. As I study the meaning embedded in both visual abstractions and processes, I shift between the roles of translator and storyteller. Pivoting between projection and analysis, I can more deeply process life’s cycles and repeating dynamics using play, intuition, and experiential experimentation as tools to expose and honor previously-veiled truths and develop new narratives. My most recent endeavor from abstraction to origin story features four poems and 108 paintings and was on display in Stockbridge in April of 2021.

 

"These Four Walls" contains work from a two-year period in which I moved six times, living in six different homes. I painted my way through the “four walls” of each of these homes as I encountered haunting, historic, and resilient parts of myself along the way.

 

We are all in development; these stories are of those stunted parts, how to help them grow up and integrate into our adult-selves, and what we can become if we are brave enough to love what we have been through and bold enough to choose the future-selves we dare believe in.

 

It starts with possibility—parent and child—and all the need, longing, and bright-eyed excitement a child can shoulder on their giddy knees. And separation. There’s always separation (that’s how we know what touching is). The dropped other-end of a tin can telephone and waiting. When nobody at all is thinking of you, do you still call it freedom? Will you make-believe with me? There’s a story I cannot tell alone.

 

I was once an egg too...